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Ancestral Health Symposium

The Ancestral Health Symposium (AHS) is a yearly networking and educational conference for our organization’s members. 

Recorded presentations from past symposia are available on our YouTube channel.

The next Ancestral Health Symposium will be in the summer of 2024!

Make sure you don’t miss out on special discounts and announcements, by subscribing to our newsletter! 

 

All our events are accessible and inclusive. We offer virtual attendance. If you have additional accommodation concerns, let us know.

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Watch past ANCESTRAL HEALTH SYMPOSIUM talks

What is Fascia?
52:16
AncestryFoundation

What is Fascia?

On this episode of Ancestral Health Today, we talked to Jill Miller about the role of fascia in health and movement.  Jill is a pioneer in forging relevant links between the worlds of fitness, yoga, athletics, massage, and pain-management, having studied movement and the human body for more than 30 years. She is the author of the best-selling books, BODY by BREATH, and THE ROLL MODEL, and creator of the fitness formats Yoga Tune Up® and The Roll Model® Method.  Miller is also a contributing author to the medical text, FASCIA, FUNCTION and MEDICAL APPLICATIONS. Known as the Teacher’s Teacher, Jill has been featured in The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Shape, Men’s Journal, Good Housekeeping, Women’s Health, Yoga Journal, Self,  and on the Today Show, Good Morning America and featured on the Oprah Winfrey Network.  She has trained thousands of movement educators, clinicians, and manual therapists to incorporate her paradigm shifting self-care fitness programming into athletic and medical facility programs internationally. Jill is a wife, mother of two children and a rescue dog, a dark chocolate lover and has recommitted to her first love, singing.  To sign up for one of Jill's events and classes, go to Tune Up Fitness (https://www.tuneupfitness.com/jill-miller-schedule)  and check out Jill and Kay Bowman's upcoming  Breast and Chest movement masterclass (https://www.nutritiousmovement.com/product/breast-chest-jill-katy/) You can also find her on Instagram @thejillmiller (http://www.instagram.com/thejillmiller) Get full access to Ancestral Health Today Substack at ancestralhealth.substack.com/subscribe (https://ancestralhealth.substack.com/subscribe?utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=CTA_4)
Ron Rosedale - What Really Causes Diabetes and Cancer? - (Ancestral Health Today Episode 024)
01:06:52
AncestryFoundation

Ron Rosedale - What Really Causes Diabetes and Cancer? - (Ancestral Health Today Episode 024)

This Second Look episode combines two AHS talks by Dr. Ron Rosedale: His 2012 talk at Harvard on Diabetes and his 2019 talk in San Diego on Cancer. Dr. Rosedale was an early pioneer of the low carb movement, and one of the first to focus on the metabolic value of increasing dietary fat rather than dietary protein. Based on a deeper understanding the roles of insulin, leptin, and mTOR in human metabolism, he crafted his Rosedale Diet, not just for weight loss, but for preventing or treating heart disease, diabetes, hypertension, and other metabolic disorders that are on the increase in the industrialized world. These two talks may seem to be about entirely different diseases. But if you watch and listen carefully, you'll appreciate how Dr. Rosedale applies a unified framework to understand metabolic diseases on a fundamental level -- as revealing an underlying problem in communication between different parts of an organism - problems stemming from aberrations in hormone signaling, growth factors, and nutrient sensors. Modern medicine often goes down the wrong road in misconceiving diseases in terms of a lack or excess or some particular chemical, gene activity, or mitochondrial dysfunction. So diabetes is thought of as a disease of too much glucose, cardiovascular disease - too much cholesterol, osteoporosis -- too little calcium. And similarly, cancer has been though of as a disease stemming from too much glucose, or activation or damage to certain genes, or to mitochondria. Dr. Rosedale's reframing of diabetes and cancer leads to practical approaches to treating these diseases. The first talk presents a challenge to the way we conventionally think about diabetes as a diesease of "too much glucose". It gets to that conclusion only in the second part of the talk, after a deep discussion of how organisms evolved to sense nutrient availability. In the case of diabetes, he focuses on the hormonal signaling, in particular the need to keep insulin and leptin signaling in check by avoiding not just too much processed carbohydrates, but too much protein in the diet. The second talk by Dr. Rosedale was delivered at the Ancestral Health Symposium in San Diego in 2019. The title is "Was Otto Warburg Wrong?" Otto Warburg was an Nobel Prize winning German physiologist of the early twentieth century, who noticed that cancer cells are adept at burning glucose thought cancer could be starved by denying it glucose. This view has been recently revived in light of failures of the genetic and free radical theories of cancer. But as you'll hear, Dr. Rosedale pokes holes in all those theories,In the second talk on cancer, he focuses on restraining the potential of cells to grow unchecked by controlling the insulin, leptin and mTOR signaling pathways. These are the hormones and pathways that facilitate healthy growth when we are young, but can cause problems like cancer particularly as we age. Finally, Dr. Rosedale suggests how a diet low in protein reduces cancer risk and can promote longer lifespan. Besides the above talks, you can learn more by reading Dr. Rosedale's book, The Rosedale Diet. Here is a guide to topics discussed in this podcast episode: Time Topic 00:00 Todd's introduction to the two talks by Dr. Rosedale 03:36 Talk #1 (AHS 2012): "The Deeper Roots of Health and Diet" 04:45 The common chemistry and metabolism of early life forms 06:44 Glucose as the first fuel for early single-cell organisms 08:47 The origins of mitochondria and fat-burning mitochondria 13:58 Nutrient sensors 14:50 How Insulin, mTOR, leptin sense glucose, protein and fat 16:10 Insulin and leptin resistance and miscommunication 16:42 Diabetes is not a disease of glucose, but of miscommunication 18:10 How fasting and ketogenic diets promote longevity 19:54 Q&A: FIber, brain nutrition, dietary protein 25:17 Todd's intro to Talk #2 26:17 Talk #2 (AHS 2019): "Was Otto Warburg Wrong?" 28:05 Critique of the genetic theory of cancer 29:09 Critique of the metabolic (glycolytic) theory of cancer 39:29 How cancer can use multiple sources of fuel 45:22 Cancer is a cause, not an effect, of mitochondrial damage 55:44 Cancer is not a disease of glucose and mitochondria 57:03 Cancer is a disease of uncontrolled growth... 59:12 promoted by growth factor like IGF, HGH, leptin and mTOR 1:03:32 Elevated mTOR promotes mitochondrial damage 1:04:54 A low protein diet suppresses cancer and extends lifespan 1:05:30 Recommendations for dietary protein limitation
A Second Look: What Really Causes Diabetes and Cancer?
01:06:52
AncestryFoundation

A Second Look: What Really Causes Diabetes and Cancer?

This Second Look episode combines two AHS talks by Dr. Ron Rosedale:  His 2012 talk at Harvard on Diabetes and his 2019 talk in San Diego on Cancer.    Dr. Rosedale was an early pioneer of the low carb movement, and one of the first to focus on the metabolic value of increasing dietary fat rather than dietary protein.  Based on a deeper understanding the roles of insulin, leptin, and mTOR in human metabolism, he crafted his Rosedale Diet, not just for weight loss, but for preventing or treating heart disease, diabetes, hypertension, and other metabolic disorders that are on the increase in the industrialized world. These two talks may seem to be about entirely different diseases.  But if you watch and listen carefully, you'll appreciate how Dr. Rosedale applies a unified framework to understand metabolic diseases on a fundamental level -- as revealing an underlying problem in communication between different parts of an organism - problems stemming from aberrations in hormone signaling, growth factors, and nutrient sensors. Modern medicine often goes down the wrong road in misconceiving diseases in terms of a lack or excess or some particular chemical, gene activity, or mitochondrial dysfunction.  So diabetes is thought of as a disease of too much glucose, cardiovascular disease - too much cholesterol, osteoporosis -- too little calcium.  And similarly, cancer has been though of as a disease stemming from too much glucose, or activation or damage to certain genes, or to mitochondria. Dr. Rosedale's reframing of diabetes and cancer leads to practical approaches to treating these diseases.  The first talk presents a challenge to the way we conventionally think about diabetes as a diesease of "too much glucose". It gets to that conclusion only in the second part of the talk, after a deep discussion of how organisms evolved to sense nutrient availability. In the case of diabetes, he focuses on the hormonal signaling, in particular the need to keep insulin and leptin signaling in check by avoiding not just too much processed carbohydrates, but too much protein in the diet. The second talk by Dr. Rosedale was delivered at the Ancestral Health Symposium in San Diego in 2019.  The title is "Was Otto Warburg Wrong?"  Otto Warburg was an Nobel Prize winning  German physiologist of the early twentieth century, who noticed that cancer cells are adept at burning glucose thought cancer could be starved by denying it glucose.  This view has been recently revived in light of failures of the genetic and free radical theories of cancer. But as you'll hear, Dr. Rosedale pokes holes in all those theories,In the second talk on cancer, he focuses on restraining the potential of cells to grow unchecked by controlling the insulin, leptin and mTOR signaling pathways.  These are the hormones and pathways that facilitate healthy growth when we are young, but can cause problems like cancer particularly as we age. Finally, Dr. Rosedale suggests how a diet low in protein reduces cancer risk and can promote longer lifespan. Besides the above talks, you can learn more by reading Dr. Rosedale's book, The Rosedale Diet. Here is a guide to topics discussed in this podcast episode: Time     Topic 00:00     Todd's introduction to the two talks by Dr. Rosedale 03:36     Talk #1 (AHS 2012): "The Deeper Roots of Health and Diet" 04:45     The common chemistry and metabolism of early life forms 06:44     Glucose as the first fuel for early single-cell organisms 08:47     The origins of mitochondria and fat-burning mitochondria 13:58     Nutrient sensors  14:50     How Insulin, mTOR, leptin sense glucose, protein and fat 16:10     Insulin and leptin resistance and miscommunication 16:42     Diabetes is not a disease of glucose, but of miscommunication  18:10     How fasting and ketogenic diets promote longevity 19:54     Q&A: FIber, brain nutrition, dietary protein 25:17     Todd's intro to Talk #2 26:17     Talk #2 (AHS 2019): "Was Otto Warburg Wrong?" 28:05     Critique of the genetic theory of cancer 29:09     Critique of the metabolic (glycolytic) theory of cancer 39:29     How cancer can use multiple sources of fuel 45:22     Cancer is a cause, not an effect, of mitochondrial damage 55:44     Cancer is not a disease of glucose and mitochondria 57:03     Cancer is a disease of uncontrolled growth... 59:12     promoted by growth factor like IGF, HGH, leptin and mTOR 1:03:32  Elevated mTOR promotes mitochondrial damage 1:04:54  A low protein diet suppresses cancer and extends lifespan 1:05:30  Recommendations for dietary protein limitation Get full access to Ancestral Health Today Substack at ancestralhealth.substack.com/subscribe (https://ancestralhealth.substack.com/subscribe?utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=CTA_4)
Emily Deans How Food can Improve your Mood - (Ancestral Health Today Episode 023)
01:06:52
AncestryFoundation

Emily Deans How Food can Improve your Mood - (Ancestral Health Today Episode 023)

In this episode, Dr. Emily Deans discusses the field of evolutionary psychiatry and its connection to mental health. Dr. Deans is a board certified psychiatrist and writes the blog Evolutionary Psychiatry, based on the observation that our brains are healthiest when we embrace a diet and lifestyle reflecting the conditions under which we humans evolved. Dr. Deans has presented at the Ancestral Health Symposium in 2012 and 2018 on topics related to this theme. In this discussion, we dive into what some of the recent clinical studies are telling us about the connection between food and mood disorders conditions such as depression. In particular, she reviews studies showing anti-depressive effects of a Meditarrean diet with meat, and also omega-3 supplementation. Dr. Deans emphasizes the importance of considering individual dietary needs and preferences when implementing diet interventions in psychiatric practice. She shares success stories of patients who have experienced improvements in mood through dietary changes, including ketogenic and low-carb diets. She also highlights the connection between glucose tolerance and violent behavior, and the importance of smoothing out blood sugar response by incorporating whole foods into the diet. Dr. Deans discusses the emerging recognition within the medical profession of food's impact on mental health. She shares her approach to helping patients reduce or come off psychiatric medications, emphasizing the importance of a multifactorial approach that includes diet, exercise, and psychotherapy. Dr. Deans also discusses the potential risks and benefits of dietary changes for individuals with eating disorders. Resources: Blog: Evolutionary Psychology, at Psychology Today: https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/evolutionary-psychiatry Studies: Smiles Trial (Felice Jacka et al): https://foodandmoodcentre.com.au/smiles-trial/ ISNPR position statement on nutrition and psychiatry: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4592666/ ISNPR guidelines on the use of omega 3 fatty acids in the treatment of major depressive disorder: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31480057/ Mediterranean diet and older adults and depression over time: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4454450/ Ketogenic diet and mood and anxiety disorders: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC10134254/ Microbiome and depression in mice (and cannabinoids!): https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-020-19931-2 Here is a guide to topics discussed in this podcast episode: Time Topic 01:30 Introduction to Evolutionary Psychiatry and Nutritional Psychology 04:32 Dr. Deans' interest in the connection between diet and mental health 08:00 The evidence from observational and randomized controlled studies 12:00 Felice Jacka's Smiles trial: Adding meat to diet reduced depression 19:03 Effects of single nutrients on mental health 20:10 Anti-depressive benefits of omega-3 fatty acids 22:22 Mental health in pre-modern populations 26:43 Impact of sugar and processed carbohydrates on mood 28:22 Physiological mechanisms: inflammation and mitochondrial dysfunction 34:37 Using diet as a tool in clinical psychiatric practice 43:20 Success stories: dietary reversal of psychosis and bipolar disorder 49:12 Ketogenic and "Slow-Carb" diets for control of anxiety and panic attacks 51:05 Violent behavior and poor glucose tolerance 53:00 The bidirectional relationship between physical and mental health 53:33 Medical profession's belated acceptance of the food-mood connection 55:58 Helping patients reduce or come off of psychiatric medications 58:07 Successes in reducing or stopping medications 58:28 Dietary changes and eating disorders 1:01:10 Current work and future plans
How Food Can Improve Your Mood
01:06:52
AncestryFoundation

How Food Can Improve Your Mood

In this episode, Dr. Emily Deans discusses the field of evolutionary psychiatry and its connection to mental health. Dr. Deans is a board certified psychiatrist and writes the blog Evolutionary Psychiatry, based on the observation that our brains are healthiest when we embrace a diet and lifestyle reflecting the conditions under which we humans evolved.  Dr. Deans has presented at the Ancestral Health Symposium in 2012 and 2018 on topics related to this theme. In this discussion, we dive into what some of the recent clinical studies are telling us about the connection between food and mood disorders conditions such as depression. In particular, she reviews studies showing anti-depressive effects of a Meditarrean diet with meat, and also omega-3 supplementation.  Dr. Deans emphasizes the importance of considering individual dietary needs and preferences when implementing diet interventions in psychiatric practice. She shares success stories of patients who have experienced improvements in mood through dietary changes, including ketogenic and low-carb diets. She also highlights the connection between glucose tolerance and violent behavior, and the importance of smoothing out blood sugar response by incorporating whole foods into the diet.  Dr. Deans discusses the emerging recognition within the medical profession of food's impact on mental health. She shares her approach to helping patients reduce or come off psychiatric medications, emphasizing the importance of a multifactorial approach that includes diet, exercise, and psychotherapy. Dr. Deans also discusses the potential risks and benefits of dietary changes for individuals with eating disorders.  Resources: * Blog:  Evolutionary Psychology, at Psychology Today:  https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/evolutionary-psychiatry * Studies: * Smiles Trial (Felice Jacka et al):   https://foodandmoodcentre.com.au/smiles-trial/ * ISNPR position statement on nutrition and psychiatry:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4592666/ * ISNPR guidelines on the use of omega 3 fatty acids in the treatment of major depressive disorder:  https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31480057/ * Mediterranean diet and older adults and depression over time:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4454450/ * Ketogenic diet and mood and anxiety disorders: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC10134254/ * Microbiome and depression in mice (and cannabinoids!):  https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-020-19931-2 Here is a guide to topics discussed in this podcast episode: Time     Topic 01:30      Introduction to Evolutionary Psychiatry and Nutritional Psychology 04:32      Dr. Deans' interest in the connection between diet and mental health 08:00      The evidence from observational and randomized controlled studies 12:00      Felice Jacka's Smiles trial:  Adding meat to diet reduced depression 19:03      Effects of single nutrients on mental health 20:10      Anti-depressive benefits of omega-3 fatty acids 22:22      Mental health in pre-modern populations 26:43      Impact of sugar and processed carbohydrates on mood 28:22      Physiological mechanisms: inflammation and mitochondrial dysfunction 34:37      Using diet as a tool in clinical psychiatric practice 43:20      Success stories: dietary reversal of psychosis and bipolar disorder 49:12      Ketogenic and "Slow-Carb" diets for control of anxiety and panic attacks 51:05      Violent behavior and poor glucose tolerance 53:00      The bidirectional relationship between physical and mental health 53:33      Medical profession's belated acceptance of the food-mood connection 55:58      Helping patients reduce or come off of psychiatric medications 58:07      Successes in reducing or stopping medications 58:28      Dietary changes and eating disorders 1:01:10   Current work and future plans Get full access to Ancestral Health Today Substack at ancestralhealth.substack.com/subscribe (https://ancestralhealth.substack.com/subscribe?utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=CTA_4)
Pilar Eguez - Ancestral Food Knowledge and Traditions (Ancestral Health Today 022)
57:41
AncestryFoundation

Pilar Eguez - Ancestral Food Knowledge and Traditions (Ancestral Health Today 022)

On this episode of Ancestral Health Today, we have a candid conversation with Pilar Eguez, PhD. We discussed the role of food and community and the ancestral ways of experiencing them. Pilar Egüez Guevara, PhD is an Ecuadorian award-winning filmmaker, cultural anthropologist, speaker and writer. She obtained her PhD from the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, two MA degrees in Anthropology (University of Illinois) and Social Sciences (FLACSO-Ecuador) and a BA in Economics from Wellesley College. After completing a postdoctoral fellowship in Community Health, in 2012 she co-founded and directed Comidas que Curan, an independent food education and media company dedicated to research and promote traditional foods and knowledge through ethnographic research and film. In 2021 the US Library of Congress selected Comidas que Curan’s website for inclusion in the historic collection of Internet materials related to the Food and Foodways Web Archive. Her films have won awards and have been screened in three different languages across North America, Latin America, Europe and Asia. Her film Raspando Coco (2019), a documentary advocating for the preservation of the culinary traditions of Afro-Ecuadorians, is now part of the library collections of 20 colleges and universities across the United States. Raspando Coco was nominated for best documentary short by the Indie Short Fest in Los Angeles (2019) and best foreign documentary by the Firenze Film Festival in Florence (2019). She also received honorable mention for best female director by the Independent Shorts Awards in Los Angeles in 2019. More recently she worked as Producer and Distribution Executive for the documentary series Tarpuna of the Seed Savers of Ecuador. She produced the documentary series episode Tarpuna: Guardians of the Coconut and the Mangrove directed by Gustavo Chiriboga, awarded for Best Sound Design (Gold Award by Independent Shorts Awards 2023), Best Documentary Short (Platinum Award by Independent Shorts Awards 2023), Best Cinematography and Best Documentary in Sustainability (Nominations by WIFI Film Festival 2023). She was the Producer for the recently released documentary film Salango: A Living Ancestral Legacy (2023) directed by Esteban Cedeño. She also directed the documentary series Jóvenes Guardianes de Saberes (Youth Heritage Guardians) which is made of three short films produced and shot collaboratively with youth and women in rural coastal towns of Ecuador (2021). Through her research, public speaking and films, she amplifies the voices of older men and women who are the bearers of traditional knowledge about food and medicine in Ecuador. She has brought this work to communities in Ecuador through filmmaking and research education projects, as well as to US college students in the United States through film screenings and Q&A sessions. She has worked directly with communities for 20 years on participatory-research and community-based projects in Argentina, Cuba, Ecuador, and the United States. She is a published author and speaks internationally on topics ranging from cultural history, food heritage, nutrition, health and conflict transformation. She is currently lecturer at the Anthropology Department of University of Massachusetts Amherst.
Ancestral Food KNowledge and Traditions
57:41
AncestryFoundation

Ancestral Food KNowledge and Traditions

On this episode of Ancestral Health Today, we have a candid conversation with Pilar Eguez (https://quinuaqueens.wordpress.com/about/) , PhD. We discussed the role of food and community and the ancestral ways of experiencing them.  Pilar Egüez Guevara, PhD is an Ecuadorian award-winning filmmaker, cultural anthropologist, speaker and writer. She obtained her PhD from the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, two MA degrees in Anthropology (University of Illinois) and Social Sciences (FLACSO-Ecuador) and a BA in Economics from Wellesley College. After completing a postdoctoral fellowship in Community Health, in 2012 she co-founded and directed Comidas que Curan (http://www.comidasquecuran.org/) , an independent food education and media company dedicated to research and promote traditional foods and knowledge through ethnographic research and film. In 2021 the US Library of Congress selected Comidas que Curan’s website for inclusion in the historic collection of Internet materials related to the Food and Foodways Web Archive.  Her films have won awards and have been screened in three different languages across North America, Latin America, Europe and Asia. Her film Raspando Coc (http://www.raspandococo.com/) o (2019), a documentary advocating for the preservation of the culinary traditions of Afro-Ecuadorians, is now part of the library collections of 20 colleges and universities across the United States. Raspando Coco was nominated for best documentary short by the Indie Short Fest in Los Angeles (2019) and best foreign documentary by the Firenze Film Festival in Florence (2019). She also received honorable mention for best female director by the Independent Shorts Awards in Los Angeles in 2019. More recently she worked as Producer and Distribution Executive for the documentary series Tarpuna (http://tarpuna.madresemilla.com/)  of the Seed Savers of Ecuador (http://redsemillas.org/) . She produced the documentary series episode Tarpuna: Guardians of the Coconut and the Mangrove (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yVz-vgwyVQ0)  directed by Gustavo Chiriboga, awarded for Best Sound Design (Gold Award by Independent Shorts Awards 2023), Best Documentary Short (Platinum Award by Independent Shorts Awards 2023), Best Cinematography and Best Documentary in Sustainability (Nominations by WIFI Film Festival 2023). She was the Producer for the recently released documentary film Salango: A Living Ancestral Legacy (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eLGu1QfWVos)  (2023) directed by Esteban Cedeño. She also directed the documentary series Jóvenes Guardianes de Saberes (Youth Heritage Guardians) which is made of three short films (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F52VXjyWJq4&list=PL8FNHmQgKZrw9acDDpWeI06kbwgWxAZk3)  produced and shot collaboratively with youth and women in rural coastal towns of Ecuador (2021). Through her research, public speaking and films, she amplifies the voices of older men and women who are the bearers of traditional knowledge about food and medicine in Ecuador. She has brought this work to communities in Ecuador through filmmaking and research education projects, as well as to US college students in the United States through film screenings and Q&A sessions. She has worked directly with communities for 20 years on participatory-research and community-based projects in Argentina, Cuba, Ecuador, and the United States. She is a published author and speaks internationally on topics ranging from cultural history, food heritage, nutrition, health and conflict transformation. She is currently lecturer at the Anthropology Department of University of Massachusetts Amherst. Get full access to Ancestral Health Today Substack at ancestralhealth.substack.com/subscribe (https://ancestralhealth.substack.com/subscribe?utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=CTA_4)
How to Reverse Myopia With Todd Becker (Ancestral Health Today Episode 021)
46:42
AncestryFoundation

How to Reverse Myopia With Todd Becker (Ancestral Health Today Episode 021)

This episode of the podcast kicks off a new feature called "Second Look", where we replay selected talks from past Ancestral Health Symposium conferences, that we think will interest you. This talk was presented by Todd Becker at the 2014 Ancestral Health Symposium meeting in Berkeley, California. The title is: "Myopia: A Modern Yet Reversible Disease" Myopia is also called near-sightedness. It's a refractive defect of the eye, where close up objects are in focus, but more distant objects appear blurred. Glasses or contacts are typically prescribed to correct this condition -- although in reality they don't actually correct the underlying problem. They are just a crutch that aids you in seeing more clearly. And often they just make the underlying problem worse, so stronger lenses are needed. Todd wore glasses for my his myopia, starting in high school, and over time the eye doctor kept increasing strength of the prescription... until he discovered how to get rid of them in his forties. The first part of talk is about about the increasing incidence and causes of myopia, including the underlying biology of how the eye becomes myopic by increasing in axial length, due to environmental factors such as poor vision hygiene -- spending too much time reading and looking at screens up close. The second half of the talk builds on this biological understanding to reverse the process, describing in detail how to use an active focusing technique to reverse myopia and restore normal vision. The method was adapted from research and practices used by others. Todd first wrote about his success and the active focusing approach in 2010, on the blog, GettingStronger.org It's one of many applications of a general biological principle known as hormesis - the judicious application of controlled low-dose stress to make the body and metabolism more resilient in different ways. The talk also indicates how the same principles can be used to reverse hyperopia, or far-sightedness, where one has trouble focusing on fine print or objects up close. Something that many people encounter as they get older. This talk on Myopia Reversal remains the single most popular recorded talk on our Ancestral Health Society YouTube channel, with well over a million views and 4000 comments. The comments fall into three main categories: A small number are from skeptics who don't believe it is biologically possible to reverse myopia. A larger number are from viewers who applied the technique with success, and either reduced their glasses prescription or got rid of their glasses or contact lenses for good. And there is another group with questions from those interested in trying the technique but are unsure about certain details. For these people, there is an FAQ post on my blog that answers many of those commonly asked questions. Here is a guide to topics discussed in this podcast episode: Time Topic 0;07 Intro to this "Second Look" at this AHS 2014 talk 4:46 Todd's story of wearing glasses until his 40s. 9:41 To reverse myopia, we need to understand the causes 6:23 Definition of myopia & possible complications 7:26 Is myopia caused by genetics or environment? 9:27 The incidence of myopia has doubled since 1970 9:58 Influences of education and diet 12:17 Interaction of genetics and environmental causes 13:15 The biological mechanism causing myopia 16:25 The Incremental Retinal Defocus Theory of myopia 18:22 How can myopia be reversed? 18:37 Applying the hormesis principle 21:06 Active focusing - what it is and how to use it 21:29 Quantify your myopia with a Snellen chart 22:33 Technique #1: Print pushing 25:36 Technique #2: Progressively weaker lenses 26:35 Technique #3: Fusing ghosted images 28:21 Frequently asked questions 33:07 Rediscover your natural vision! 35:08 Q&A and references
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